Helping patients to navigate the fragmented healthcare landscape in Berlin: the NAVICARE stroke-atlas

the cover the Berlin Stroke Atlas

Research on healthcare delivery can only do so much to improve the lives of patients. Identifying the weak spots is important to start off with, but is not going to help patients one bit if they don’t get information that is actually useful let alone in time.

It is for that reason that the NAVICARE project not only focusses on doing research but also to provide information for patients, as well as bringing healthcare providers together in the NAVICARE network. The premise of NAVICARE is that somehow we need to help patients to navigate the fragmented healthcare landscape. We do so by using the diseases stroke and lung cancer as model diseases, prototypical diseases that help us focus our attention.

One deliverable is the stroke atlas: a document that provides different healthcare providers – and people and organizations who can help you in the broadest sense possible once you or your loved one is affected by a stroke. This stroke atlas, in conjunction with our personal approach at the stroke service point of the CSB/BSA, will help our patients. You can find the stroke atlas here (in German of course).

But this is only a first step. the navigator model is currently being further developed, for which NAVICARe has received additional funding this summer. I will not be part of those steps (see my post on my reshuffled research focus), but others at the CSB will.

REWARD | EQUATOR Conference 2020 in Berlin

https://www.reward-equator-conference-2020.com

Almost 5 years ago something interesting happened in Edinburgh. REWARD and EQUATOR teamed up and organized a joint conference on “Increasing value and reducing waste in biomedical research “. Over the last five years, that topic has dominated Meta-research and research improvement activities all over the world. Now 5 years later, it is again time for another REWARD and EQUATOR conference, this time in Berlin. And I have the honor to serve on the local organizing committee.

My role is so small, that the LOC is currently not even mentioned on the website. But the website does show some other names, promising a great event! it starts with the theme. which is “Challenges and opportunities for Improvement for Ethics Committees and Regulators, Publishers, Institutions and Researchers, Funders – and Methods for measuring and testing Interventions”. That is not a sexy title like 5 years ago, but it shows that the field has outgrown the alarmistic phase and is now looking for real and lasting changes for the better – a move I can only encourage. See you in Berlin?

https://www.reward-equator-conference-2020.com

BEMC has a Journal Club now

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After a year of successful BEMC talks and seeing the BEMC grow,  it was time for something new. We are starting a new journal club within the BEMC community, purely focussed on methods. The text below describes what we are going to to do, starting in February. (text comes from the BEMC website)

BEMC is trying something new: a journal club. In february, we will start a monthly journal to accompany the BEMC talks as an experiment. The format is subject to change as we will adapt after gaining more experience in what works and what not. For now, we are thinking along the following lines:

Why another journal club?

Aren’t we already drowning in Journal clubs? Perhaps, but not with this kind of journal club. BEMC JClub is focussed on the methods of clinical research. Many epidemiological inclined researchers work at departments who are not focussed on methodology, but rather on a disease or field of medicine. This is reflected in the topics of the different journal clubs around town. We believe there is a need for a methods journal club in Berlin. Our hope for the BEMC JClub is to fulfill that need through interdisciplinary and methodological discussions of the papers that we read.

Who is going to participate?

First of all, please remember that the BEMC community focussed on researchers with a medium to advanced epidemiological knowledge and skill set. This is not only true for our BEMC talks, but also for our JClub.

Next to this, we hope that we will end up with a good group that reflects the BEMC community. This means that we are looking for a group with a nice mix in background and experience. That means that if you think you have unique background and focus in your work, we highly encourage you to join us and make our group as diverse as possible. We strive for this diversity as we do not want the JClub sessions to become echo chambers or teaching sessions, but truly discussions that promote knowledge exchange between methodologist from different fields.

What will we read?

Anything that is relevant for those who attend. The BEMC team will ultimately determine which papers we will read, but we are nice people and listen carefully to the suggestions of regulars. Sometimes we will pick a paper on the same (or related) topic of the BEMC talk of that month.

Even though the BEMC team has the lead in the organisation, the content of the JClub should come from everybody attending. Everybody that attends the Jclub is asked to provide some points, remarks or questions to jumpstart the discussion.

What about students?

Difficult to say. The BEMC JClub is not designed to teach medical students the basics in epidemiology. Then again, everybody who is smart, can keep up and contribute to the discussion is welcome.

Are you a student and in doubt whether the BEMC JClub is for you? Just send us an email.

Where? When?

Details like this can on the BEMC Jclub website. Just click here.

Starting a research group: some thoughts for a new paper

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It has been 18 months since I started in Berlin to start at the CSB to take over the lead of the clinical epidemiology research group. Recently, the ISTH early career taskforce  have contacted me whether I would be willing to write something about my experiences over the last 18 months as a rookie group leader. The idea is that these experiences, combined with a couple of other papers on similar useful topics for early career researchers, will be published in JTH.

I was a bit reluctant at first, as I believe that how people handle new situations that one encounters as a new group leader is quite dependent on personality and the individual circumstances. But then again, the new situations that i encountered might be more generalizable to other people. So I decided to go ahead and focus more on the description of the new situations I found myself in while trying to keep the personal experiences limited and only for illustrations only.

While writing, I have discerned that there are basically 4 new things about my new situations that I would have loved to realise a bit earlier.

  1. A new research group is never without context; get to know the academic landscape of your research group as this is where you find people for new collaboration etc
  2. You either start a new research group from scratch, or your inherit a research group; be aware that both have very different consequences and require different approaches.
  3. Try to find training and mentoring to help you cope with your new roles that group leaders have; it is not only the role of group leader that you need to get adjusted to. HR manager, accountant, mentor, researcher, project initiator, project manager, consultant are just a couple of roles that I also need to fulfill on a regular basis.
  4. New projects; it is tempting to put all your power, attention time and money behind a project. but sometimes new projects fail. Perhaps start a couple of small side projects as a contingency?

As said, the stuff I describe in the paper might be very specific for my situation and as such not likely to be applicable for everyone. Nonetheless, I hope that reading the paper might help other young researchers to help them prepare for the transition from post-doc to group leader. I will report back when the paper is finished and available online.

 

Moving to Berlin!

After about 8 years learning and working in Leiden at the LUMC, it is time for something new. I’ve got a new job as the head of the ‘Clinical Epidemiology and Health Services Research in Stroke’ unit at the Center for Stroke research in Berlin (CSB, http://www.schlaganfallcentrum.de). This a very exciting opportunity for me: working with new colleagues on new projects, learning more about stroke research and strengthen the epidemiological studies that are executed at the CSB. I am looking forward to work with these brilliant and creative minds especially the guys from the CEHRIS team.

With moving to Berlin I will have to leave Leiden, which do regret. Not only because of the great research, but also because of the students and co-workers. Fortunately, I think that this new chapter in my academic life will provide ample opportunity to start new collaborations between Berlin and Leiden.