Replication: how exact do you want to be?

Doing exactly the same experiment for the second time around doesn’t really tell you much. In fact, if you quickly glance over the statistics it might look like you might as well do a coin flip. Wait.. What? Yup, a coin flip. After all, doing the exact same experiment will provide you with a 50/50 when it comes to detecting the true effect (50% power).


The kernel of truth is of course that a coin flip never adds new useful information. But what does an exact replication experiment actually add? This is the question we are trying to answer in latest paper in PLOS Biology where we explore the added value of replications in biomedical research. (see figure). The bottom line is that doing the exact same thing (including the same sample size) really has only limited added value. To understand what than the power implications for replication experiments actually are, we developed a shiny app, where readers can play around with different scenarios. Want to learn more? take a look here: s-quest.bihealth.org/power_replication


The project was carried by SP, which resulted in a paper published in PLOS Biology (find it here). The paper got some traction on news sites as well as twitter, as you see from this altmetric overview

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